By Katharina Grosse, these huge, beautiful sculptural installations utilise their environment by being painted in situ making each set-up entirely unique. I feel torn between thinking of a martian landscape, or a Lovecraftian fifth dimension. 

(Source: mymodernmet.com)


By David Catá, these somewhat gruesome but beautiful sewn portraits of people that have impacted upon the artist in his life are part of an ongoing project called ‘A Flor De Piel’. Each is a perfect representation of the concept, of loss and pain—then the residual mark left in its wake. 

(Source: beautifuldecay.com)


From National Library of Sweden, this breathtaking 16-century book can be opened and read as 6 different books, not to mention being an antiquarian work of art, now that’s one hell of a Kindle prototype! And just as an added extra, look at this embroidered little beauty

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)


By Mr Finch, this amazing gentleman is hands down one of the best anatomical soft sculpture artists around, using found fabrics and seeking inspiration from the English countryside and it’s critters. 

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)


By Allison Schulnik, one of my all time favourite painters (and animators) with a brilliant, dark, and surreal animation that is an absolute must watch full-screen with the volume up. From about 4:50 I was blown away, seeing is believing. 

(Source: booooooom.com)


By John Grade, some artists just have a natural flare and innate understanding of forms and textures, and how they interact with spaces—there is something about Grade’s work that just works so well on every one of these levels. 

(Source: booooooom.com)


By Hiroko Kubota, whist making custom shirts for her young son, Kubota gave in to a request of his for cats on his shirts from a vast library of internet felines. Interest boomed, and now if you really want one you can purchase one from her Etsy store—if you’re quick that is, they go like hot-cakes.

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)


By Camila Carlow, these stunning floral sculptures of human organs really capture anatomical form and nature in each piece. The temporary nature of blossoms also gives the work a hint at mortality and the human condition—they’re wonderful, it’s fairly easy to work out which is what organ!

"This work invites the viewer to regard our vital structures as beautiful living organisms, and to contemplate the miraculous work taking place inside our bodies, even in this very moment,"

(Source: mymodernmet.com)


Mini interview with SpliceLit

As part of a joint mini interview collaboration, we have worked with the wonderful online magazine SpliceLit to bring you an insight into the workings of what it takes to run a creative site. You can read our responses over on their blog here. And here are the questions we put to the team;

How is it that your magazine came to life? And how challenging is it to run a creative magazine coming up with concepts each issue?

SpliceLit has been a collaborative effort and changing everyday. The idea first came to Veda during her senior year of college, after writing a paper about digressions in literature. She was also playing a game called The Path, an interactive retelling of Little Red Riding Hood. The game helped her realize that the way we consume information and the way we tell stories (fiction or about life) has changed drastically! Veda brought up the idea at a writing group and, along with Meagan and Rachel, worked on bringing our ideas about reading and interactivity to life. The concepts for each issues come from writers. If we find a story or a writer that we love, we reach out and work with them to create something that will inspire other artists!

How do you think online magazines compare to print? Do you think SpliceLit would ever make the progression into print?
Online magazines allow for a community—comment sections encourage conversation and SpliceLit encourages our readers to interact directly with the story. All these things are possible in print (highlight a passage, cutting out an image from a newspaper and making a zine using the image), but not as immediate as publishing online. Currently, SpliceLit is solely an online magazine—it works best for our mission. 
What is the most exciting part about combining visual artists and writers to create something new?
Collaboration is such a natural aspect of any type of art, and it’s very rewarding bringing artists across mediums together to produce one complete, original piece of work. It’s great because no one really knows what the finished product is going to look like until it’s completed - and the finished product is different for everyone, including our readers. It’s also fascinating to see the same story or the same character from so many different points of view - it makes everything deeper and more three dimensional. 
Who has been the most interesting person/people that you have met through the magazine? And why?
We get to meet so many people who are supportive and interested in our goals. One of the best aspects of SpliceLit is that it makes story a democratic experience - each reader and artist contributes something special and important to the magazine

Where do you as a team, see your future as a website and magazine going? And finally, what upcoming projects are you working on?
Our first issue was a learning experience: it helped us find our voice and aesthetic. In our second issue, we hope to improve and strengthen our design to encourage people to participate in the story and digressions. We are really excited about Issue 2: Prayers—we are working with some cool artists who have really pushed the love story in innovative directions! 
Their first issue was a fascinating read and I’m excited to read the second when it comes out, there’s something so wonderful about getting different groups of creative individuals together to make something new. You can view their issue one here.

By Carl Krull, this beautiful set of scroll drawings while resembling sound-waves have subtle hints of forms and figures that make each one alluring and fascinating. The even more surprising dimension to this series—is that they have each been drawn while in a moving car, so each bump is incorporated into the image.

(Source: booooooom.com)